Share

28k

Average number of bottles of Champagne consumed during Wimbledon, the world’s oldest tennis tournament. The celebrated annual fortnight would have featured its Singles Championships this weekend, but for cancellation due to COVID. Despite strict rules of etiquette for observing the tournament, several matches each year are disrupted by popping corks. Other quintessential Wimbledon comestibles consumed with abandon are an average of 235,000 glasses of Pimm’s and 142,000 portions of strawberries.

Share

400

Estimated age of the so-called “Mother Vine,” believed to be the oldest grape vine in North America. Planted in the late 1500s on North Carolina’s Roanoke Island, the vine belongs to America’s oldest known species of native grapes, muscadine (vitis rotundifolia) and still bears fruit today. Muscadine, which early settlers renamed “scuppernong” after the nearby river, is only half as sweet as vitis vinifera, requiring the few producers of muscadine wine to add sugar to reach even 10% abv

Share

15

Maximum grams of alcohol (the equivalent of 4-ounces of wine) consumed per day that offers the highest probability of reaching 90 years of age. A study conducted at Maastricht University Medical Centre in the Netherlands has found that men and women who drank an average of one glass of wine or beer per day had a longer life expectancy than abstainers and heavy drinkers. The authors of the study emphasize that its results should not be used as motivation to start drinking.

Share

1700

Estimated number of wine blogs worldwide in 2019. One of the original wine blogs—Alder Yarrow’s Vinography—began in 2004, and by 2009 there were over 700. Today, the vast majority are penned by so-called “citizen bloggers,” versus winery or press blogs. Of these citizen blogs, 60% are in English with the rest divided among other languages including Italian, French, Catalan, Portuguese, Czech, German, Spanish, Dutch, Japanese, Chinese, Hungarian, Norwegian, and Indonesian.

Share

59

Percent increase in off-premise vermouth sales for the twelve weeks ending May 23, compared to last year, according to Nielsen data. Essential to making Negronis, Manhattans, and Martinis, vermouth (wine that’s been fortified and flavored with botanicals) is among the bar staples that home mixologists are stocking up on during the COVID crisis. Will those who’ve mastered the art of the cocktail at home still pay a premium for one at a bar? We bet the wit and wisdom of a veteran bartender will always trump a DIY shot. Oh for those days!

Share

29

Percentage of immigrant-owned businesses in the hospitality industry, compared to just 14 percent of U.S. businesses overall. The restaurant/foodservice industry is one of the most diverse in America, employing men and women of all ethnicities and backgrounds. The industry boasts more minority managers than any other industry. In addition, the number of restaurants owned by African Americans and Hispanics has grown 59% and 51% respectively over the past five years.

Share

500

Number of kilos (1100 pounds) of grapes per day that a picker in Champagne can harvest. Manual picking remains the tradition in Champagne since the 18th century and is required. Each year about 120,000 pickers, working in teams called hordons, have a roughly three-week window to bring in the entire 400k tons of fruit (the region’s mandatory cap on yields, equal to 10,400 kg/hectare or 4.6 tons/acre).

Share

120

Number of countries that officially recognize the name Champagne as the name of a wine that comes only from the Champagne region of France. According to the Comité Champagne (CIVC), the U.S. does not protect the name (nor do Argentina and Russia). That’s unfortunate, for the very premise of fine wine is that it reflects its place of origin. To that end, Champagne, along with 30 other organizations in the world, belongs to the Wine Origins Alliance, dedicated to ensuring that the names of wine regions are protected and not miscommunicated to consumers.

Share

1

Estimated number of bubbles (in millions) in a glass of Champagne, according to the calculations of Gérard Liger-Belair, a professor on the “Effervescence Team” at the Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne in France. The bubbles, which are clusters of carbon dioxide molecules dissolved in the wine, collect on tiny dust particles inside the Champagne glass until they are big enough to race to the surface. Bubbles are not just textural; they also influence flavor (See “Ask Karen” below).

Share

40

Percent increase in worldwide consumption of rosé wines from 2002 – 2018. According to a study by the Provence Wine Council (PWC), rosé’s rise far surpasses that of still wines at only 5%. More than half of global consumption comes from France and the U.S.—not surprising as we Yanks celebrate National Rosé Day tomorrow. A recent consumer survey by marketing firm Wine Opinions, points to Millennial’s as the driving force behind the increase in demand.

Share

10K

Number of tons of CO2 emissions that Torres winery in Spain will capture as a result of an extensive reforestation program they have initiated in Patagonia, Chile. Torres is a family-owned wine company based in Penedès, Spain, and celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. A leading member of International Wineries for Climate Action (IWCA), Torres operates a photovoltaic solar array which powers its wineries across Spain. They have also converted 80% of their vehicles to hybrid or electric.

Share

0.1

Percent of wineries in the U.S. that are owned by African Americans, according to Phil Long, owner of Longevity Wines and President of the Association of African American Vintners (AAAV). “Careers in wine are not often visible in black communities,” he says. The AAAV sponsors internships and scholarships for aspiring wine professionals and helps to raise awareness of the wines made by black winemakers in the U.S.